Extra Good

Flying the Extra 300S  as close to the edge as I’ve seen

Dipping aerobatic sighting devices in the water @  0:15 is  new to me. Very skilled. And crazy. A  few inches away from cart wheeling across the lake. 

What a great plane. Pilot’s pretty good too.

(h/t to Tom G)

Advertisements

11 responses to “Extra Good

  1. Yeah, Wilco, pretty good. alright. As the old heads in my day would say in their grudgingly “no-slack” highest form of compliment: “He’s fair.” LOL

    • Hitting the #3 wire and a perfect landing is graded “OK” in naval aviation IIRC. Although an Air Force landing with a wire is, I expect, not optimal .

  2. Well, it’s “optimal” if you have an emergency. 🙂
    The F-4, being originally a Navy derived aircraft had a “true” rigid metal bar tailhook same as the Navy. AF Bright Bulbs figured out this might be useful and they began to equip runways with both approach end and departure end barriers that consisted of a combination of tapes and chains and disk-brake like devices to use for airborne emergencies or take off problems in the case of the departure barriers. Later AF only fighters have a flexible cable tailhook that can only be engaged once aircraft is on runway. This barrier system used to be know in AF circles as the “Tape Dragon” and at first a lot of jocks were hesitant to use it as that was a “Navy” thing. Back in the day to encourage its use they used to award a nice little “Grand Order of the Tape Dragon” plaque
    for successful utilization as use of such things was rare in those days. It’s so common now I’m sure they’ve discontinued it by now. If you want a good technical description an ex-AF F-4 Driver who flew out of Thailand I just found has by happenstance a great post up on just this subject. He’s a little older than me and still flies “heavy equipment” for Delta out of northern Cali. Go visit at:

    http://davesdailies.blogspot.com

    Blog is titled “Davesdreams” Seems like a great guy.

  3. Geez, wierd, just talked to him yesterday, but blogger says he doesn’t exist. I found him researching AF barrrier systems to see if I could find a picture to show you and got linked to him that way, but otherwise he doesn’t seem to exist. I book-marked him, so still can get back, but I don’t know how anyone else in world would cause google doesn’t list either except thru an article on their BAK-9 (barrier) systems. NO WONDER he doesn’t get any traffic. I’ll have to go and break the news!

  4. Enjoyed the additional background. The only recipient of the tape dragon award I know is(Spaz)Sinbad, the story link which I will post if I can locate.
    I’m reviewing more Vietnam flying history once again in “Bury Us Upside Down” mainly about the Misty pilots. FAC’s like you with a little more speed and a lot of time in Pack 6.
    I marvel at the nav systems in Delta Sierra weather. Never mind someone shooting SAMs and AAA at you as well. There must have been some careful checking of survival gear before every mission!

  5. Just poking around here and came across this…. My dad was the lead engineer for the development of the BAK-9 system. An amazing pc. of equipment which has no doubt saved countless lives over the years. We’ve been working with the guys at Zodiac on building the early years history.

  6. Yes, the BAK-9 was developed by Dad and two other guys for EW Bliss Co. They had a difficult time getting technical information out of the AF, so they commissioned Tiffany’s to create a little dragon flying a jet where the tail was the ‘hook’. The Grand Order of the Tape Dragons was born from that. Notices were posted on flightline bulletin boards asking pilots of arrestments to contact my Dad and the company. Upon relaying their experiences, they were awarded the lapel pin and inducted into the Tape Dragons. I’m working with Dad (the last surviving engineer) and the people at Zodiac Aerospace on filling in the “early years” of development of the arresting equipment. Just shot some pics today of the lapel pin and Dad’s Tape Dragon plaque along with him in his coveralls he had during development.

  7. VX nice to find you here (very sad about NepLex). And Scott thanks for your info elsewhere on the BAK-9 development history (time now May 2012). Back on 01 Sep 1971 after a night rampstrike during my second night deck landing (after about the required 20+ day deck landings beforehand – my first DLs) I required an empty drop tank landing in an A4G Skyhawk back at NAS Nowra, NSW, Australia. It was well known that the two underwing tanks were ideal emergency undercarriage for damaged wheels. Mine were useless as reported by another A4G in flight. With fuel low I was able to successfully arrest using the portable mirror on Runway 26, just floating/squeaking over the wire so that the hook would engage (and not the front of the drop tanks). There was a burst of flame from fuel vapour in the empty drop tanks which was quite bright on such a dark night and I was able to step out of the A4G straight onto the runway (no ladder required) to hotfoot it away from there. 🙂

    Story PDF made from an e-mail years ago now is available at SpazSinbad on SkyDrive – look in the ‘Documents’ folder for “Ramp-Strike-01-Sept-71-no8.pdf” 7.6Mb at: https://skydrive.live.com/?cid=cbcd63d6340707e6&sa=822839791#cid=CBCD63D6340707E6&id=CBCD63D6340707E6%21116

    • Dominick Addamiano

      Dominick Addamiano | November 16, 2012 at 6:37 pm | Reply
      Your comment is awaiting moderation.

      On Nov 22, 1963 , the day President JFK was assinated,as and enlisted man who worked on the communication/navigation equipment, was fortunitly enough to catch a ride on a F100F at Wheeles Air Force , Libyia , North Africa and what and experience it turned out to be. Upon returning to the base and landing , under severe crosswinds , we had no drag chute and no breaks, till this day I can still see the marker signs go by as we spead down the runway, all 13,000 feet of which 3000 feet was over run. Remember engaging the barrier cable and coming to a very controlled stop. Upon being released from the barrier and taxing out of the area our wingman engaged the barrier also. We didnt quite clear the area and the engaged cable damaged the tail section of our aircraft, as a young 20 year old who never flew in a jet prior I had one hell of and experience , especially thinking after when the pilot told me to put my seat down all the way, only found out later what he meant and how close we came to ejecting on the ground.Appoximately a year later I received my gold label pin and my plaque which I still show off proudly to my kids and grandkids. I use to get invintation to yearly reunion for 3 or 4 years in row held in Washington, DC. I was told at the time I was the only enlisted man who belonged to this prestiges club.

  8. Dominick Addamiano

    On Nov 22, 1963 , the day President JFK was assinated,as and enlisted man who worked on the communication/navigation equipment, was fortunitly enough to catch a ride on a F100F at Wheeles Air Force , Libyia , North Africa and what and experience it turned out to be. Upon returning to the base and landing , under severe crosswinds , we had no drag chute and no breaks, till this day I can still see the marker signs go by as we spead down the runway, all 13,000 feet of which 3000 feet was over run. Remember engaging the barrier cable and coming to a very controlled stop. Upon being released from the barrier and taxing out of the area our wingman engaged the barrier also. We didnt quite clear the area and the engaged cable damaged the tail section of our aircraft, as a young 20 year old who never flew in a jet prior I had one hell of and experience , especially thinking after when the pilot told me to put my seat down all the way, only found out later what he meant and how close we came to ejecting on the ground.Appoximately a year later I received my gold label pin and my plaque which I still show off proudly to my kids and grandkids. I use to get invintation to yearly reunion for 3 or 4 years in row held in Washington, DC. I was told at the time I was the only enlisted man who belonged to this prestiges club.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s