Traveling in Style

This was as it should be – passengers in closed cabin, pilot in open cockpit so he will stay awake. This airplane is in Spokane and is the oldest flying Boeing aircraft.
Boeing Passenger Plane

After 8 years of repair and rebuilding and 8,000 hours of toil the Boeing 40C rolled out last winter as a finished airplane. They had to wait a few weeks for the snow to melt to fly this baby. They received their Standard Airworthiness Certificate from the FAA and completed the engine pre-oil and fuel flow tests for the first of the taxi tests. 

Rear of plane

Facts for the Boeing 40 project: 


221 gallons of dope/reducer and 120 yards of 102 ceconite fabric. 12 gallons of polyurethane paint for the sheet metal. The wings have 33,000 individual parts in them. The airplane weighs 4080 lbs empty, has a gross weight of 6075 lbs. It is 34 ft long and 13 feet tall with a wing span of 44 feet.       

Wing loading is 10 lbs per sq ft and power loading is 10 Pounds per HP. It should cruise at 115 mph using 28 GPH, and 32 GPH at 120 mph. It carries 120 gallons of fuel in three tanks. 
Interior
350 – 2 inch brushes were used to apply 6 gallons of West Systems epoxy, and 181 rolls of paper towels for cleanup. 

There were a total of 62 volunteers who worked on the project to some degree. 21 of the volunteers did a significant amount of work, and 9 of the volunteers worked continuously during the 8 year project. 

 

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2 responses to “Traveling in Style

  1. virgil xenophon

    Notice the long donward vented exhausts to carry sound safely past and away from passengers in fwd section. Most aircraft of that era simply vented exhausts straight from headers. THAT, however would have made it a mite like riding inside a church organ.

  2. Your aviation acumen never ceases to amaze and you are one prolific writer. I did wonder about pilot to pax communications and expect that neither had a terrific jouney. Humble beginiings in the early days.

    At least I provide in flight entertainment , telling jokes and humming on the intercom. But my passengers have learned to turn off the volume.

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